Recipe: Winner’s Half-Moon Chocolate Orange Macaroons

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She blurted something that had nothing to do with anything. “Do you know how to make honeyed half-moons?” 

“Do I…” He lowered the map. “Kestrel, I hate to disappoint you, but I was never a cook.” 

“You know how to make tea.” 

He laughed. “You do realize that boiling water is within the capabilities of anybody?”

The Winner’s Curse by Marie Rutkoski, 5/5 stars

For some novels, food is almost a central character, like Brian Jacques’s Redwall series. (I can’t believe I haven’t covered any Redwall yet!) Typically, I just don’t feature the novel on my blog if food isn’t prominent, though I’ll give the book a shoutout on my Bookstagram. Then there’s books that are just too good to let slide by. I don’t care how far I have to stretch a recipe to relate it back to the book, it will be on the blog! The fruit tart I created for Illuminae is a perfect example of this. Nobody ate a fruit tart in Illuminae. In fact, I think all food products were freeze dried. Ew.

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Recipe: Pumpkin-Cranberry Bran Muffins

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Now let me say this: when you’re traveling a good cloak is worth more than all your other possessions put together. If you’ve nowhere to sleep, it can be your bed and blanket. It will keep the rain off your back and then sun from your eyes. You can conceal all manner of interesting weaponry beneath it if you are clever, and a smaller assortment if you are not. 

But beyond all that, two facts remain to recommend a cloak. First, very little is as striking as a well-worn cloak, billowing lightly about you in the breeze. And second, the best cloaks have innumerable little pockets that I have an irrational and overpowering attraction toward.

— The Name of the Wind by Patrick Rothfuss, 5/5 stars

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Recipe: Hazelnut Apple Strudel

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“Entering the recommended cafe, Maisie took a seat. When the young waitress approached, she ordered a coffee with hot milk and some apple strudel. She was very hungry. Soon the waitress returned to the table, using the palm of her free hand to smooth out the white embroiled tablecloth.” 

Click here for my review of Jacqueline Winspear’s Journey to Munich.

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